BMJ - updates

Rappler's latest stories on BMJ

ARTICLE FINDER

Fast food calorie info only cuts intake temporarily – study

Oct 31, 2019 - 3:22 PM

Presenting the calorie count of fast food items leads to a short-term decrease in calories in the U.S. but only until a year, the study says

Genes, yes, but obesity pandemic mostly down to diet – study

Jul 04, 2019 - 10:53 PM

Researchers say that for people genetically predisposed to a wider girth, these unhealthy lifestyles compounded the problem, resulting in an even higher rate of weight gain

Older dads' kids run higher health risks at birth – study

Nov 01, 2018 - 5:46 PM

Babies of fathers 45 and older are more likely to be underweight or wind up in intensive care, says a research published by The BMJ

Study shows air pollution linked to higher risk of dementia

Sep 19, 2018 - 11:10 AM

The medical journal BMJ Open publishes a study which says chemicals cast off by tailpipe pollution are associated with an increased risk of dementia

SMOG. File photo shows students wearing face masks walking across the street in a line in Jinan, in east China's Shandong province amongst heavy air pollution on December 24, 2015. Photo by AFP

Is Peppa Pig to blame for putting pressure on doctors?

Dec 13, 2017 - 3:40 PM

The British Medical Journal traditionally carries jokey pseudo-scientific articles in its Christmas special and in this year's edition it pokes fun at Peppa Pig's jolly Dr Brown Bear

JOLLY DR. BROWN. A woman poses in London on December 12, 2017 looking at a screen showing an episode of British animated series Peppa Pig involving the character Dr Brown Bear. Peppa Pig, the cartoon character loved by toddlers around the world, could be to blame for creating unrealistic expectations of doctors, according to an article in a respected medical journal. A woman poses in London on December 12, 2017 looking at a screen showing an episode of British animated series Peppa Pig involving the character Dr Brown Bear. Peppa Pig, the cartoon character loved by toddlers around the world, could be to blame for creating unrealistic expectations of doctors, according to an article in a respected medical journal. Photo by Daniel Sorabji/AFP

Can you drink too much milk? Study raises questions

Oct 29, 2014 - 10:02 AM

A study says Swedes with a high intake of cow s milk died younger but further studies are needed before a definitive conclusion can be arrived at

TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING? A study indicates it may be. AFP file photo

First possible H7N9 human-to-human transfer reported

Aug 07, 2013 - 7:38 AM

Development worrying should be closely watched; researchers stress the virus believed to jump from birds to people is still inadept at spreading among humans

ON ALERT. A woman wears a face mask as she walks past a poster showing how to avoid the H7N9 avian influenza virus, by a road in Beijing on April 24, 2013. Photo by AFP / Wang Zhao