Wannacry ransomware - updates

Rappler's latest stories on Wannacry ransomware

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Ransomware 'hero' pleads guilty to U.S. hacking charges

Apr 20, 2019 - 8:41 AM

'I regret these actions and accept full responsibility for my mistakes,' the 24-year-old Marcus Hutchins, known by his alias MalwareTech,' writes, noting that the charges related to his activity prior to his work in security

'I REGRET THESE ACTIONS.' In this file photo taken on August 14, 2017, Marcus Hutchins (R), the British cyber security expert accused of creating and selling malware that steals banking passwords, arrives with his lawyers at US Federal Courthouse in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Photo by Joshua Lott / AFP

Chip giant TSMC says WannaCry behind production halt

Aug 06, 2018 - 8:00 PM

TSMC says some of its computer systems and equipment in its Taiwan plants were infected on August 3 during software installation. The incident is expected to cause shipment delays and cut third-quarter revenue by 2%.

U.S. says North Korea led WannaCry cyberattack

Dec 19, 2017 - 6:35 PM

Among the infected computers were those at Britain's National Health Service (NHS), Spanish telecoms company Telefonica and US logistics company FedEx

UK security researcher 'hero' accused of creating bank malware

Aug 04, 2017 - 4:42 PM

Marcus Hutchins known by the alias Malwaretech is charged in an indictment dated July 12 and unsealed this week by federal authorities in Wisconsin

Seoul cyber experts warn of more attacks as North blamed

May 16, 2017 - 3:10 PM

The code from the latest attack shares many similarities with past hacks blamed on the North including the targeting of Sony Pictures and the central bank of Bangladesh says Simon Choi director of Seoul internet security firm Hauri

What we've learned from the WannaCry ransomware attacks

May 16, 2017 - 12:30 AM

An equivalent scenario with conventional weapons would be the US military having some of its Tomahawk missiles stolen says Microsoft s Brad Smith

BOUND. The WannaCry ransomware attack locked out 200,000 computers, with perpetrators asking for US$300 as a ransom fee. Illustration by Nico Villarete/Rappler